Quinten Dormady back in a big way


Quinten Dormady back in a big way

There’s an old saying in sports – you don’t lose your starting job to an injury.

As Quinten Dormady is showing, you don’t lose your status to an injury, either.

This is a story that has two sides, and the first one is not pleasant. But the ending is decidedly upbeat.

As a sophomore at Boerne High School, located outside San Antonio, Texas, Dormady made an instant impact as the Greyhounds’ quarterback. He completed 228 of 372 passes for 3,010 yards and 27 touchdowns and was voted District 27 Offensive Player of the Year.

Primed for an even more impressive junior season in 2013, Dormady was playing varsity baseball for Boerne near the end of his sophomore year when he dove back into second base.

Just like that, his prized right throwing shoulder was severely injured. “I knew pretty much right off the bat something was wrong, but we didn’t know how bad it really was,” Dormady said. “There was a little bit of time there where there was a little bit of hope I could rehab it and be OK. Once I found out I needed to have surgery and I was going to miss the football season, that was the hardest part. We were going to pretty good last season, so that made it tough.”

Dormady injured his shoulder in a May 31 playoff baseball game. A week later, he was in Florida, where the renowned Dr. James Andrews repaired the damaged labrum.

The injury wiped out his junior football season, but that didn’t mean Dormady stayed away from the sport he loves.

Team player

“Once I got hurt, I kind of turned into a coach,” said Dormady, whose father Mike is Boerne’s head football coach. “I didn’t really have a backup. My sophomore year, we had a senior that played quarterback if I went down, but he didn’t take many practice reps. Going into my junior year, I was kind of the guy, you know, so once I got hurt I turned into a coach and had to get one my good friends in my grade (David Snelling) to play that role, play quarterback. We trained every day during the summer, 7-on-7, that kind of stuff to try to get him ready.”

Big-time athletes can handle a serious injury in one of two ways. They can sulk and stay down or they can pick themselves up and stay a part of the team.

Dormady – who has been training with NFA since middle school – obviously positioned himself in the latter camp, and that speaks volumes of his character.

But while he was helping the Greyhounds from the sidelines, Dormady was also working hard to come back from the shoulder injury.

“The day after the surgery, they were moving my arm so I didn’t build up scar tissue,” Dormady said. “For a month after that, my arm was in a sling and I was doing nothing. The biggest thing I could do was ride a stationary bike. A couple weeks after I was out of the sling I started jogging and doing footwork stuff. So a month and a half out from surgery, I was doing football stuff, not throwing, but working on my footwork.”

The Greyhounds were not able to overcome the loss of their standout starting quarterback last season. Had they been able to make the playoffs, Dormady was hoping to be back under center. “I started throwing the football again about halfway through the season,” he said. “So that was about three and a half months after surgery. That’s two weeks earlier than most people, so I was really moving fast as far as the rehab went. It went really good.”

Moving forward

This is where the story starts taking a positive turn for the 6-foot-4, 210-pound quarterback.

Not only is Dormady’s torn labrum completely healed, being away for his whole junior football season has reinforced the passion he has for a sport he’s been playing since his childhood. “It put things into a new perspective, for sure,” Dormady said. “Going into this year, I mean it was hard, my junior season. There were times where it was, ‘Man, this is just rough.’ But right now, now that I’m back and I’m not just standing there not being able to do anything, I can actually throw and all that stuff, I am definitely ready for this season. Being hurt, it really makes you think about what you’ve been given and the gifts you’ve been given, and that they can be taken away in a split second like it was for me. It definitely makes you look forward to each day and take it day by day and not be complacent.”

Playing college football has long been a dream for the tall Texan, but missing his key junior season surely makes that impossible, right? Wrong.

As we mentioned at the top of the story, Dormady’s shoulder injury has not had a negative impact on his status for playing at the next level. Injuries, even major ones, can only slow big-time talents like Dormady. Now that he is back up and running, Dormady is attracting widespread college attention.

First offer

Houston is the first school to offer. “I visited (in late March) and watched their practice,” Dormady said. “I kind of clicked with their coaches right away. They wanted to come (to Boerne H.S.) the first day they could, April 15, and watch me. It was pretty much a certainty they were going to offer me then. But I got a direct message two days after I was there and they offered me because they just felt like I fit.”

Is Dormady also a fit at schools like Texas, Alabama, Oklahoma State, Penn State and TCU? “I just kind of want to wait it out until the end of the spring, most likely,” he said. “Wait and see what happens there as far as more offers and who knows what else. There are a couple of schools that I like and I feel good about with their coaches and everything. So I just want to wait it out and see. Hopefully, I’ll know where I’m going before my senior season.”

There were probably times early in the rehab process where Dormady didn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel. That’s just human nature. Not only has he come barreling out on the other side, Dormady is fired up for his final year of high school football and moving on to the next level.

“Right now, I’m really excited, even with starting 7-on-7 and competing with the guys again,” Dormady said. “I’m looking forward to getting into the fall here and then I’m graduating early, hopefully. That’s my plan, and then get there and start living what my dream’s always been and set new goals.”


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Scot Gregor is an award-winning sportswriter for the Chicago Daily Herald. In addition to writing about Big 10 and Notre Dame football, Gregor has also covered the White Sox, Bears, Blackhawks, Bulls and college basketball. He grew up in Pittsburgh and watched the Steelers rise to prominence in the 1970s. Gregor has a B.S. degree in Journalism from Ohio University